The Mall, Standing the Test of Time

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The Mall Road, officially called Shahrah-e-Quaid-e-Azam is the most historic road in urban Lahore. Constructed in the reign of the British Empire (1849-1947), the idea was to build a new town center outside the gates of the Mughal walled city to accommodate increase in business, population and a growing need to cater to the British lifestyle. By Marian Sharaf Joseph

The Mall

By Marian Sharaf Joseph

The Mall Road, officially called Shahrah-e-Quaid-e-Azam is the most historic road in urban Lahore.

Constructed in the reign of the British Empire (1849-1947), the idea was to build a new town center outside the gates of the Mughal walled city to accommodate increase in business, population and a growing need to cater to the British lifestyle.

The Mall, approximately 8 km long is almost two centuries old and has been the most happening place ever since. In fact, it was at one time the only hip place in town because of the multicultural people living and working in this area. Cheyenne House and Pak Tea House were the gossip corners for creative minds; Cathy Restaurant was the first Chinese cuisine in town. Clubs, restaurants and bakeries dotted the road including Shezan in Diyal Singh Mansion, Salt n Pepper and Gogo restaurant coming in early 1980’s. The modern shopping center of that time, Anarkali, Capri restaurant in Tollinton market, YMCA, Regal cinema and the Freemason Hall made the Mall an ultra hip hang out.

Being the town center, the Mall is the only place in Lahore that is well planned. The area is divided into twelve main blocks starting from Upper Mall, the downtown going all the way to Lower Mall, the uptown spot. However, what makes the Mall the hallmark of Lahore is the buildings constructed during the Colonial British Raj; the block that includes government offices – the Punjab Assembly, the Governor House and City District Office; public offices – the General Post Office, the High Court, the State Bank and the Red Cross, religious buildings – the Regal Mosque, the Sacred Heart Cathedral and the Cathedral Church of the Resurrection as well as education institutes like the Punjab University and National College of Arts. ¨

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This article was originally published in the print edition of Valuemag, issue 2, June 2008.

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Fareeha Qayoom
Fareeha Qayoom
Publisher and editor-in-chief of Tkfr.com and former print editions of The Knit-Xtyle Fashion Review (tkfr), a trade newsletter for the textile and apparel industry of Pakistan. In short, Publisher, editor, and a blogger. In addition, she has served as Managing Editor of MIT Technology Review Pakistan, print and web editions (2015-16). Total of 7 editions were published under her leadership by ITU, Punjab's first public technology university under the license of MIT Technology Review (USA). She has also managed Value Mag in the same capacity, a real estate and lifestyle magazine for Value TV - 2008-9. Published freelancer for The News on Sunday 1994-96. Fareeha has over 21 years of solid management experience – of managing brands (like Harley Davidson, Munsingwear, Chaps, Chaps Ralph Lauren etc.,), Retailers (like Target, Mervyns, Kohl's, Marks and Spencer etc.,), customers (VPs, Product Managers, Unit Managers, and Buyers), and products (apparel - woven, knits, men's, women's, children's, Print and online publishing units), projects, teams, and processes, information, content, and data, staff, vendors, and time. Versatile and adaptable with international exposure, communication and language skills (oral and written), and a consistent track record of achieving company targets and objectives, plus a MA in Political Science from Punjab University, a MSc in Economics from La Salle University, Louisiana, USA, and a BA in Economics from Kinnaird College for Women.

1 Comment

  1. Grandeur that was once The Mall
    By Chauburji | Published: October 21, 2010

    The Lahore that was
    Nations who destroy history are apt to destroy themselves in the cultural sense and this is what is happening to the beautiful pieces of architecture that once adorned the City of Lahore. Historic sculptures were pulled down in the name of religion and many beautiful buildings that depicted a mix of colonial and traditional architecture were demolished to pave the way for ugly glass fronted plazas. Mercifully, some of these eye-catching landmarks still stand, thanks to the efforts of concerned citizens and someone or the other in authority.

    http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/Opinions/Columns/21-Oct-2010/Grandeur-that-was-once-The-Mall

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